Red Sea Hot Brines

Three different forms of seeing the same material:  small reddish gritty stuff is the raw material, embedded in an area of the same sediment seen through a microscope by cell biologist Nina Stromgren Allen, and outside of that is the sediment fired.

Three different forms of seeing the same material: small reddish gritty stuff is the raw material, embedded in an area of the same sediment seen through a microscope by cell biologist Nina Stromgren Allen, and outside of that is the sediment fired into ceramic glaze.

This Red Sea area, so rich with colors from beiges to ochres to iron reds and burnt siennas, makes me wonder, why is it so hot down there?  Why is the mud so crystalline and sticky?  Why does it smell like iodine?

The Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute gave me some jars that were badly marked and useless to scientists, from a cruise that provoked plenty of questions from scientists because they discovered water temperatures of 56°C (133°F ).   Equatorial sun?  Hydrothermal vents?  Find an interesting article at WHOI’s Dive and Discover on-line archive.

Red Sea Original Jars

Later, Amy Bower gave me a different sample along with this map:

Red Sea from Amy Red Sea "Discovery Deep" Map

Puddled and crystalline (not unlike the raw form) this moved during its molten state in the kiln chamber and interacted with matte non-oceanic glaze as it moved.

Puddled and crystalline (not unlike the raw form) this moved during its molten state in the kiln chamber and interacted with matte non-oceanic glaze as it moved.

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